Egg Substitute Baking- 11 Vegan Substitutions for Eggs

One of the things I love most about baking is the ability to create sweet and savory flavors. Warm fluffy biscuits, savory breads and melt-in-your-mouth pancakes are just a few examples of the marvelous things you can do with flour and–eggs? If your vegan (or aspiring to be one) the world of baking has proven to present some tricky challenges in terms of re-creating those childhood comfort food favorites that require non-vegan elements like milk, eggs and butter.


So lets start with finding an egg substitute in baking, because I’m decided on two things; I am embarking on a vegan journey without looking back and I will absolutely not give up my baked goodies! In the spirit of this determination and with the help of The Complete Guide to Even More Vegan Food Substitutions, I have compiled an incredibly useful list of egg substitutions that you can use in your favorite recipes, with none the wiser!

Eggs-In-Carton

Replacing 1 Egg

These substitutions may be used in both sweet and savory dishes.

  • Flaxseeds: 1 tablespoon (7 g) freshly ground flaxseeds combined with 3 tablespoons (45 ml) water, whisk and let stand for a few minutes, the mixture will become thick  and viscous.

This substitution works well as a binding agent. For leavening combine a 1/4 teaspoon of baking powder into the mixture, I recommend a non-aluminum type.

Examples of Effective Uses: Veggie burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, dressings, sauces, cookies, muffin pancakes, yeast breads and cakes.Flaxseeds-Green

  • Chia Seeds: 1 tablespoon (10 g) white chia seeds that have been ground into a meal with a coffee grinder. Combine this with 3 tablespoons (45 ml) water. Whisk an allow to stand for a few minutes, the mixture will become thick an viscous.

This substitution works well as a binding and/or thickening agent. The seeds need not be ground when used as a binding agent but appear less visible when they are, they may be better off ground depending on the dish.

Examples of Effective Uses: Veggie burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, dressings, sauces, cookies, muffin pancakes, yeast breads and cakes.

  • Nut or Seed Butter: 3 tablespoons (48 g) natural creamy or crunchy peanut, seed or other nut butter.

This substitution works well as a binding agent and/or moisturizing agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: Veggie burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, fritters, cookies and muffins.

  • Soft Siken Tofu: 1/4 cup (60 g) blend soft silken tofu.

This substitution works well as a binding and/or moisturizing agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: dressings, sauces, provides body and lift to veggie burgers, cookies, cakes pancakes, waffles and yeast breads. Can create heavier results, in this case a 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder can be used as a leavening agent. 

  • Vegan Yogurt: 1/4 cup (60 g)

This substitution works well as a binding and/or moisturizing agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: dressings, sauces, provides body and lift to veggie burgers, cookies, cakes pancakes, waffles and yeast breads. Can create heavier results, in this case a 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder can be used as a leavening agent. 

  • Corn Starch, Potato Starch or Arrowroot Powder: 2 table spoons (16 g) whisked with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of water.

This substitution works well as a binding agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: veggie burgers, meatballs, meatloaf, pancakes, cookies, cakes, muffins and waffles.

  • Mashed or Pureed cooked vegetable: 1/4 cup (60 g), examples include beans, sweet and white potato.

This substitution works well as a binding and/or moisturizing agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: veggie burgers. meatloaf, meatball, fritters. Can create heavier results, in this case a 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder can be used as a leavening agent.

Muffin-Egg-Substitute

 

***For baked goods that are more sweet than savory, 1/4 cup of unsweetened applesauce or pureed/ mashed fruit can be used instead of vegetables. Please note, applesauce may not be a good choice for chewy cookies, the results may be more cake-like than dense and chewy.

Examples of Effective Uses: soft cookies, pancakes, waffles and muffins.

Additional Egg Substitutes for Sweet Baked Foods

  • Water and Cornstarch: 1/4 cup (60 ml) and 1 1/2 teaspoons of cornstarch. Dissolve 1 1/2 teaspoons of corn starch in 2 teaspoons (10 ml) of water, once dissolved whisk in the remaining water into a slurry and cook for 30 seconds to 1 minute until consistency is gelatinous and cloudy.

This substitution works well as a binding and leavening agent. It provides great structure without adding flavor. To boost leavening qualities add 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder.

Examples of Effective Uses: fluffy baked goods like brioche, cakes and muffins.

  • Psyllium Seed Husk (Whole Psyllium Husks): combine 1 teaspoon of this with 3 tablespoons (45 ml) of water and let stand for 3 minutes. It should be used promptly after this since it continues to thicken.

This substitution works well as a binding agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: crackers, cookies and waffles.2

Clafoutis

  • Chickpea flour: combine 1/4 cup (30 g) of chickpea flour with 1/4 cup (60 ml) water or vegan milk.

This substitution works well as a binding and/or moisturizing agent.

Examples of Effective Uses: cookies, clafoutis and cakes.

  • Bob’d Red Mill egg replacer or Ener-G: whisk 1 1/2 teaspoons of this powder with 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of warm water until frothy.

This substitution works well as a binding and/or leavening agent. It is not a first choice in substitution options but is effective if this is all you have on hand.

Examples of Effective Uses: mostly cookies, but can create chalky baked goods.

  • Neat Egg: mix 1 tablespoon (7 g) of this powder in 2 tablespoons (30ml) of water.

This substitution works well as a binding agents.

Examples of Effective Uses: cookies and pancakes.

I hope you find these substitutions helpful, the possibilities are endless in terms of how substitutions can be used. I believe the trick lies in playing around with your favorite recipes until you find the right substitution for a specific recipe. I have personally found success with applesauce in some of my favorite cake recipes but I am excited about exploring new recipes and different substitutes.

I have shared a simple and easy scramble “egg” recipe below. Enjoy!

 

scrambled-eggs

 


Scrambled Eggs Recipe-Vegan

  • Ingredients

Water –1/2 cup (120 ml)

Nutritional Yeast -2 tablespoons (15 g)

Cornstarch -2 tablespoons (16 g ) 

Black Salt (kala namak) -1/4 teaspoon

Turmeric -1/4 teaspoon

Oil (Neutral flavored) -2 tablespoons (30 ml )

Firm or Extra Firm Tofu -1 block (12 ounces or 340 g ) drained and pressed

Salt and Pepper

Blend the water, nutritional yeast, cornstarch, black salt and turmeric with an immersion blender and set aside. You may also do this by hand.

Over medium high heat, preheat oil in a frying pan. Crumble the tofu and add to the hot oil, saute for 2 to 3 minutes while tossing constantly. Slowly stir in the water and cornstarch mixture and stir until thickened, this should be about 3 to 5 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, serve immediately.

***I love the idea of throwing in some sauteed mushrooms, garlic powder and chopped scallions to boost the flavor potential of this dish!

Newman, J.M. & Steen, C. (2015). The Complete Guide to Even More Vegan Food Substitutions. Fair Winds Press. Beverly, MA.

Marilyn

12 Responses

  1. This is great, I am glad I found this piece of text because I can’t use eggs, doctors tell me I have high cholesterol and that I should eject them from my nutrition. I really did not know that chia seeds can replace eggs, I will definitely start using it as a replacement, thank you for sharing, you helped me a lot.

    • Thank you Daniel.  Glad to have helped you.  We will be doing recipe videos with written instructions soon.  Hope this will help you further. 

  2. This is a great site. Being vegan is important to a lot of people. It could be moral reasons or health reasons. So, its great that someone has made a site that helps. I was especially surprised with the tofu. How is it that tofu can replace an egg? Are there any recipes that don’t require eggs at all? Or what about recipes that require milk?

    • Hi Marlo, Thank you for visiting. There are many recipes out there that don’t require the use of eggs or milk. Once we identify the functional use of eggs and milk in a recipe, I’m finding that there are plenty of plant based foods which offer the same functionality. The interesting part is playing around with flavors to either hide the fact that your not using a dairy product or create a new flavor twist in a traditional recipe. The possibilities are really endless!

  3. Wow!! Just Wow!!! I never knew there were so many alternatives you could use to replace eggs with. I’m Definitely going to check some of these out.  I was wondering though. Which of the alternatives would you recommend as the best solution.  Flavor and texture wise. And do the baked goods still taste as good. I’m still new to the whole vegan thing. I find it kind of limiting. Glad I found your website!!! Really opens up my options!!

    • Hi and thanks Arron! I have personally found applesauce, oils and flaxseed to be the best solutions flavor-wise. The baked goods are still delicious. I had a vegan ginger cookie today that was rich, chewy and moist. It contained zero dairy without lacking flavor and texture. This particular cookie used flaxseed as an egg substitute. As you play around with different recipes the other egg substitute options are equally good. I used to think the vegan movement was limiting as well but I realized I only felt that way because the alternatives/choices were completely foreign to me! 

      • Awesome. I’ll keep this in mind. Seen you said something about offering video recipes as well in the near future. can’t wait to check them out!!!

  4. Wow, I had absolutely no idea you could use so many different things to substitute for an egg!  I never would have thought it possible until I read your post.  I do have one, itty bitty question, and I don’t mean to cause offense.  Why would a vegan want a vegan recipe for scrambled eggs?  I mean, I suppose if they really love scrambled eggs, but since the main ingredient is eggs in that dish, wouldn’t it make it taste really different and thus not be scrambled egg-like at all?  I could see substituting eggs in baked goods or something.  But I’d honestly be a little scared how it would come out by substituting that much of a dish.  

    To be honest, I haven’t had luck with things like almond milk and soy milk.  It just doesn’t taste right at all to me, even when used like in an Almond Milk creamer for my coffee.  Just… eh.  I’m weird about my food though.  So I guess if it works!!  But if I ever succeed in going vegan, it would have to taste really close to actual eggs. I’m so freaking picky!

    Thanks for your post!  I’ll let my vegetarian friend know about it.  She’s always looking for new things to try.  ^_^

    • Thank you for visiting Selenity Jade! I absolutely see what you are saying. To be quite honest, it seems to be easier for many people who have grown up on a certain diet to transition into a new one, like veganism, by creating those same traditional recipes they have come to know and love. Scrambled tofu may certainly not taste like a fried egg but it is a delicious alternative and perhaps to the mind, looks like something familiar and comforting. These sorts of recipes seem to be more transitional and adaptable.

      I would suggest giving flax, cashew, hemp, rice, coconut or oat milks a try! Why stop at almond and soy!? 🙂

  5. I had heard of egg replacements but I did not know the list could be that long.  I did not realize seeds could be used for egg substitution or there was such a thing as chickpea flour.  I will have to find the latter.  There is even a dish of scrambled eggs without actual eggs.  Wow.  It sounds tasty too.

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